Last edited by Togore
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Palmyra or Tadmor in the desert found in the catalog.

Palmyra or Tadmor in the desert

Lamia Doumato

Palmyra or Tadmor in the desert

by Lamia Doumato

  • 371 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by Vance Bibliographies in Monticello, Ill .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Tadmur (Syria),
  • Syria,
  • Tadmur
    • Subjects:
    • Architecture -- Syria -- Tadmur -- Bibliography.,
    • Tadmur (Syria) -- Bibliography.

    • Edition Notes

      Cover title.

      StatementLamia Doumato.
      SeriesArchitecture series : Bibliography ;, A-52
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDS99.P17 D68
      The Physical Object
      Pagination14 p. ;
      Number of Pages14
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4453223M
      LC Control Number79115761

      Colonnaded Street and capitals on the ground According to the Bible King Solomon gave importance to the oasis of Palmyra and he established a caravanserai there (built Tadmor in the wilderness - II Chronicles ), but not all archaeologists agree on Palmyra being the Tadmor of the oasis was not located on a traditional main route between the Mediterranean and the Persian Gulf; to. Palmyra or Tadmor: oasis in the desert between Damascus and the Euphrates, important trade center, and capital of a semi-indepent state in the third century CE. History 1. History 2. History 3. History 4. History 5. Late Antiquity Diocletianic camp, sanctuary of the standards.

      “Tadmor ” means city of palms. Tadmor: called "Tadmor in the wilderness," is the same as the city known to the Greeks and Romans under the name of Palmyra. It lay between the Euphrates and Hamath, to the southeast of that city, in a fertile tract or oasis of the desert. Being situated at a convenient distance from both the Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf, it had great advantages. Palmyra is in the heart of Syrian Desert, and is often described as the bride of the desert. Its magnificent remains tell of a heroic history during the reign of Queen Zenobia. These are the remains.

      Palmyra: Mirage in the Desert, published simultaneously in English and Arabic, is the latest volume in the Metropolitan Museum symposium series. It is a major contribution to the knowledge and understanding of this multicultural desert city— located at the crossroads of the ancient world— that will help preserve the memory of this. Ancient Palmyra: The History and Legacy of One of Antiquity?s Greatest Cities by Charles River Editors, Charles River Editors and a great selection of related books, .


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Palmyra or Tadmor in the desert by Lamia Doumato Download PDF EPUB FB2

TADMOR (Heb. תַּדְמֹר; Palmyra), an oasis city at the point of intersection of the caravan roads in the central Syrian desert and the steppe land between Lebanon and Jabel Bishri, halfway between the Euphrates and the Orontes River in the Mediterranean Sea classical sources it is called Palmyra, a direct translation of its Semitic name Tadmor, which is obviously connected with.

The author is adapting an earlier story, found in the book of Kings, where we read that Solomon "built Tamar in the wilderness of Judah". note [The reference in Chronicles only proves that Tadmor was known as far away as Jerusalem. Some of Palmyra's tower tombs. So, Tadmor was a stopover along a little used caravan road.

Reading this book, and spreading its message, is an act of resistance and defiance against the “creatures who had emerged from the womb of ignorance and the dark grottoes of hatred for the noble and the beautiful” and took the life of a great man and attempted to erase Tadmor/Palmyra and its culture from the face of the earth (p.

23). Palmyra, also called Tadmur, Tadmor, or Tudmur, ancient city in south-central Syria, miles ( km) northeast of name Palmyra, meaning “city of palm trees,” was conferred upon the city by its Roman rulers in the 1st century ce; Tadmur, Tadmor, or Tudmur, the pre-Semitic name of the site, is also still in city is mentioned in tablets dating from as early as the 19th.

Flavius Josephus also attributes the founding of Tadmor to Solomon in his Antiquities of the Jews (Book VIII), along with the Greek name of Palmyra. Several citations in the tractates of the Talmud and of the Midrash also refer to the city in the Syrian desert (sometimes interchanging the letters "d" and "t" - "Tatmor" instead of "Tadmor").

See PALMYRA. The Nuttall Encyclopaedia. James Wood. TACOMA; TAEL; Look at other dictionaries: TADMOR — (Heb. תַּדְמֹר; Palmyra), an oasis city at the point of intersection of the caravan roads in the central Syrian desert and the steppe land between Lebanon and Jabel Bishri.

Palmyra is an ancient archaeological site located in modern-day Syria. Originally founded near a fertile natural oasis, it was established sometime during the third millennium B.C.

as the. Tadmor, today mostly known by its secondary name Palmyra, was an ancient caravan city located in the eastern Syrian desert. The city began about 5, years ago, forming at an oasis and within a virtual forest of palm trees (some sayindividuals of 17 species of palm, olive and pomegranate trees).

The Hebrew Bible (Second Book of Chronicles ) records "Tadmor" as a desert city built or fortified by King Solomon of Israel, it is likewise mentioned in Talmud (Yebamot 17a-b). Flavius Josephus mentions the Greek name "Palmyra" and also attributes the founding of "Tadmor" to Solomon in his Antiquities of the Jews (Book VIII).

Tadmor (city of palms), called "Tadmor in the wilderness," is the same as the city known to the Greeks and Romans under the name of lay between the Euphrates and Hamath, to the southeast of that city, in a fertile tract or oasis of the desert.

Being situated at a convenient distance from both the Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf, it had great advantages for caravan traffic. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

It was a trading city in the extensive trade network that linked Mesopotamia and northern Syria. Tadmor is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible (Second Book of Chronicles ) as a desert city built (or fortified) by the King Solomon of Judea: There had been a temple at Palmyra.

Palmyra or Tadmor in the desert (Architecture series: Bibliography) [Doumato, Lamia] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Palmyra or Tadmor in the desert (Architecture series: Bibliography)Author: Lamia Doumato.

(Heb. תַּדְמֹר; Palmyra), an oasis city at the point of intersection of the caravan roads in the central Syrian desert and the steppe land between Lebanon and Jabel Bishri, halfway between the Euphrates and the Orontes River in the Mediterranean.

In this important and timely publication, top international scholars present current research and developments about the art, archaeology, and history of the ancient city of Palmyra, a UNESCO World Heritage site located in Syria.

Palmyra became tragic headline news inwhen it was. The Hebrew name of the oasis city better known as Palmyra. The city’s location—in the middle of the Syrian desert, almost exactly halfway between Damascus and Mari—was strategically important for trade between Mesopotamia and the eastern Mediterranean.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Software. An illustration of two photographs. The ruins of Palmyra, otherwise Tedmor, in the desart by Wood, Robert.

TADMOR tăd’ môr (Heb. תַּדְמֹ֖ר), the city of palm trees, later made famous in Gr. and Lat. history as Palmyra, was an ancient military outpost, trading center, and customs station located in the Syrian desert, half-way between Damascus and the upper Euphrates was a large and pleasant oasis with wonderfully fine mineral springs, fertile soils, and many gardens and palm.

این پرونده ویکی‌تلمبار دله دَره. ونه دله‌ی بنویشته‌ئون (مازرونی) ره اینجه سِراق دنه. ویکی‌تلمبار ات‌جا هسته که ونه درون آزاد عکسون ره یلنه. شما هم بتونّی ونه دله کا بکنین. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: "The essays in this volume are based on papers and lectures presented in 'Palmyra: Mirage in the Desert,' a symposium held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on " -- Title page verso.

Tadmor is also mentioned as built by Solomon in Flavius Josephus Antiquities of the Jews - Book VIII, along with the Greek name of Palmyra. Tadmor is the name of Palmyra in modern Hebrew.

The exact etymology of the name "Palmyra" in this case is unknown, although some scholars believe it was related to the palm trees in the area. Like Damascus, Palmyra was a settlement built around an oasis in the desert.

Both Damascus and Palmyra were important stops for caravans along the Syrian Silk Road. Palmyra was turned into a flourishing city, complete with two temples. Palmyra: Mirage in the Desert Paperback – Octo by Joan Aruz (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" $ $ $ Paperback $ 6 Used from $ 11 New from $Author: Joan Aruz.